Human Resources Management

Human Resources Management System

Time Management Tips for Increasing Productivity

Managing your time and using it wisely is a journey, and not something that can be easily mastered overnight. Implementing a plan will help, but it is not going to be a sure cure. Time management requires a significant amount of self-discipline.

Here are some tips to assist you with time management…


1. Set Goals

Set both short-term and long-term goals for your work day, work week, and work year. While it may seem silly, take the time to make a written list of your goals, which will allow you to refer back to the list when you need some guidance. Keep in mind that it is okay to adjust the goals as your business needs or your role changes. Use them as a tool to guide you.

2. Mini-Rewards

All work an no play is a difficult concept to sustain for very long. Build rewards into your schedule. If there is a task you really dislike, follow it with a task that you greatly enjoy. Build “mini-rewards” into your schedule to increase your productivity.

3. Keep Lists

Keep a running “To Do” list. The To Do list should contain both daily tasks as well as longer-term tasks. Having a To Do list will help keep your attention on the projects that require attention, and prevent some items from slipping through the cracks and being forgotten.

4. Be Realistic

Keep your expectations realistic. No one can do everything, and with that it mind, try to set realistic expectations of what you can hope to accomplish.

5. Prioritize

Prioritize the list of things to do. Some items might require immediate attention, while others may be necessary but not as urgent. And after prioritizing, try not to become a “firefighter” and only react to the urgent items. Be sure to still give proper attention to non-urgent items as well, as they are important too.

6. Use Time Wisely

If there are blocks of time that you spend waiting or commuting, figure out ways to use that time being productive! Listening to podcasts, reading, writing, proof-reading, reviewing your schedule, planning for your next activity, etc, are all things that can usually be done remotely to fill in some of the unavoidable “dead” time in your schedule. Try to find interesting and unusual productive things to do during those periods of downtime.

7. Set Limits

Set reasonable time limits for tasks. When working on those tasks, monitor the time that each item is taking.

8. Organize Work Space

Organize your work space, and remove any excessive clutter. Spending time looking for something is a waste of time… and time is a precious commodity. Both your computer files and your physical working area should be organized so that you can easily locate anything you need in a moments notice.

9. Minimize Distractions

If you find yourself consumed by social media, facebook, instant messaging, or other social mediums, set aside a specific and timed period of the day for participating in the online social community. Other than those specific periods of time, set your status to “unavailable” so that you are not interrupted throughout the work day. Minimize interruptions and distractions as much as possible.

10. Reflect

At the end of the day, reflect on what you accomplished. If you were unable to account for a specific period of time, or you found a given day to be particularly unproductive, take an inventory and try to determine where your time management system broke down.

Keep in mind that not every day is going to be as productive as you would hope. Unexpected things always come up, and no matter how hard you try, your expectations just might not be realistic. Do not become discouraged. Instead, simply stay focused and make an effort to increase your productivity the next day.

What is Employee Relationship Management ?

The term “Employee Relationship Management” (acronym ERM), translate as “management of the relationship with the employees” refers to the use of technologies in the management of human resources. This concept is based on client relationship management, with the employee at its center.

This involves implementing a dedicated information system for the management of human resources (generally referred to as HRIS), which makes it possible to cover all problems that are related with the relationship between a company and its employees, in particular:

  • Training, i.e. the preparation of an overall training plan of the company which makes it possible to handle a catalog of compulsory or optional internships, requests by employees, and tracking of training actions;
  • Pay, to prepare a statement of payments and mailing of salary bulletins;
  • Recruiting, in particular follow-up on recruiting interviews and new recruits;
  • Competence and career management, consisting in the implementation of a competence reference standard which permits improved management of jobs within the enterprise and in-house transfers. The goal is to value human assets by prioritizing the competences, knowledge, and know-how of the employees;
  • Time management, i.e. the management and quantification of the activity of the employees of the company, in particular with a view to compliance with existing laws (reduction of working hours, payment of overtime, accounting of vacation, work breaks and absences);
  • Internal communication, which permits sensitization and transversal information, which makes it possible to break the isolation of the different sectors of the enterprise

Top 10 HR Mistakes to be avoided

We all make mistakes. However, in business, mistakes that involve your people can severely drain your bottom line, your piece of mind and possibly your entire business. We will start out this month by reviewing the top 10 human resources mistakes” and then, in the coming months, go more in depth on each one.

1. Not hiring for talent and fit
You want to hire for 1) skills and knowledge, 2) talent and 3) fit. There is a difference between the three. Skills are the “how to” of a role and are capabilities that are learned. Knowledge is “what you are aware of,” either factually or experientially, and can be transferred from one person to another. Talents are natural or acquired capabilities and a key recurring pattern of thoughts, feelings or behaviors. Talents are extremely difficult to teach. An ideal fit will not, in itself, result in superior performance, although fit becomes an issue if the person’s values and behaviors are not in alignment with the organization’s culture.

2. Hiring quickly and firing slowly
When companies do not have sufficient staff to cover an open position, they may rush through the hiring process and make a poor hiring decision. Poor hires are typically a costly mistake. They take up a supervisor’s time, create “bad vibes” among current employees and increase costs for an organization. Poor hires can affect service and product quality and create a poor impression with customers. While training supervisors in lawful and effective interviewing and hiring practices, it is important to also develop and train them on a formalized effective disciplinary action process. Too often, poor performers are allowed to languish instead of being held accountable
in a more timely manner.

3. Poor leadership, lack of effective communication
If you want to be an effective and motivating leader — you had better know the difference between leading, managing and coaching. Leaders influence, do the right things and are outward-focused. Remember, leaders do right things. Managers do things right. All of us could use a little more coaching — it helps others become more successful. Always deal with your employees with open, honest and direct communications. Maintain self-esteem during all interactions with your employees and respond with empathy.

4. Not appreciating generational differences
Ask the two people sitting closest to you this question. “Where were you when Kennedy died?” Boomers and older people will think of JFK, while younger people will think of JFK Jr. Boomers have a view of Gen X as “the army of aging Bart Simpsons — armed and possibly dangerous.” Gen X views job security as a big joke and Gen Y is the largest of the three generations at 80-plus million. While they were the centers of their parents’ universe, you as a Boomer or a Gen X supervisor do not have to send the “carbon copy” of their latest performance appraisal home to their mother.

5. Winging it with pay practices
Having no system is not defensible and may result in perceptions of favoritism. A recent World at Work survey of HR and compensation professionals found that 78 percent of their organizations had a “formal compensation philosophy,” yet only 26 percent said theirs was in writing. A formal compensation system, including written compensation philosophy, will support the attainment of your strategic goals by helping your organization’s ability to attract, reward and retain the necessary organizational talent. It also allows supervisors, managers and business owners to have a rational conversation with employees regarding how they are compensated.

6. Failing to recognize and reward people effectively
Fifteen percent of the value of a company is traceable to tangible assets; the other 85 percent is intangible. Human capital is the dominant asset in modern business strategy. Employees leave for a variety of reasons, the most common among them being:

  • Poor supervisory relationships
  • Lack of opportunities for growth and development
  • Inadequate recognition and rewards.

Three key ways to keep your employees:

  • make them feel valued (supervisory issue)
  • make them feel appreciated (rewards and recognition)
  • provide opportunity for growth (learning and growing)

7. Not providing growth, development opportunities even with limited budgets for formal “employee development programs
Companies need to invest in their human capital” to meet ever-increasing customer requirements in today’s global economy and leaner organizational structures. With a higher percentage of employees being described as knowledge workers, providing new technologies and the opportunities for “continuous learning” is essential, particularly with younger workers. Organizations that fail to provide more than lip service to the development of their people are likely to experience higher turnover and lower levels of customer and employee satisfaction.


8. Allowing an inwardly-focused culture to develop.

Who is your customer and what’s the reason your organization exists? Customers these days are smarter, price-conscious, approached by more competitors, more demanding and less forgiving. It takes 12 positive occurrences to overcome one negative experience.

9. Failing to successfully navigate the changing legal landscape
U.S.-based companies and their employees enjoy many employment rights and freedoms (i.e. from unlawful discrimination to sexual harassment) that have evolved over the past 40 years of federal, state and local legislation and through legal rulings on statutory law.
New legislation and legal rulings are continuously occurring, requiring employers to stay on top of the changes and ensure that they — including all of their supervisors and managers — are in compliance while performing and interacting in their daily roles.

10. Not effectively dealing with complex HR issues
Not everyone has the ability or desire to deal with people and their issues. If you are the one dealing with employees at your business, know your limitations. What is your personality, motivation, expertise of the jobs and how much time do you realistically have to recruit and manage employees? If you have a person who handles your HR, do they understand people? Do they keep their technical skills sharp? Do they support the organizational direction? Do they have attention to detail?

Employees are the only truly unique component of any organization and can help it grow and prosper as well as fail and die. The investment in effective HR practices and functions is as critical to the success of an organization as having the right equipment, materials, products and processes.

Top 10 Tips for Hiring and Retaining Solid Employees

All of a company’s employees add value and contribute to its success – some in small way, others in large measure. Because sound recruitment and retention strategies provide a competitive edge, hiring should be done carefully, methodically and strategically. Here are ten ways to attract top prospects to your company and retain them once they’re on board.

1. Recruit Continuously
Aggressive companies are always on the prowl for talent. They have a sense of what skills they need now and in the future, and what type of person will be a good fit. They look even when there are no current openings, because one can never predict when an employee might leave.

2. Know What You Nee

Know the skills and personality traits that will make a person successful in a given job, so you can develop job descriptions when you’re hiring. This helps in framing interviews with potential applicants, who in turn learn in advance more about the skills needed for the position.
Initially, a job description facilitates the selection of the right employee. But a good job description also ensures that he or she has a clear understanding of responsibility, authority and expected results, so it also becomes a useful training outline.

3. Interview Many Candidates

Don’t hire the first person you like. Commit to meeting a number of people – even though you won’t be interested in most of them. If you don’t think a person is a good fit for your company, use the interview to dig up information on your competitors or create a business-development opportunity. (Who knows where your company’s next alliance partner will come from?)

4. Ask Probing Questions

The only way to find out if candidates will be a good fit for your company is to ask a lot of questions to discover whether:
they possess a positive attitude.

  • they have high energy.
  • they are trustworthy and possess good character.
  • they feel good about themselves and life.
  • they take responsibility without making excuses.
  • they desire to keep learning and hunger for growth.
  • they are willing to follow the leader and work with the team.
  • they have a good track record.
  • they are able to flow with the organization and accept change.

5. Check References

Today’s employment laws are extremely strict on how much information can be obtained regarding past employment; previous employers are not supposed to give out any information other than the length of employment. They cannot give out any information with regard to skills, attitude, attendance or anything else in the applicant’s job history while employed there.

6. Clarify Expectations
New employees seldom know exactly what is expected of them, how they will be measured, or with whom they will work the most. It’s important to communicate expectations and metrics clearly and succinctly from Day One.

7. Offer Attractive Compensation
Money buys the house and the bacon, but it also represents recognition and fairness. Talented people expect their contributions to be acknowledged and their compensation to reflect their impact. If necessary, do a competitive compensation survey.

8. Establish a Buddy System
Often overlooked yet consistently successful, mentoring systems give employees a sense of history and community when they enter a new company environment. By introducing recruits to the office culture immediately, mentors make them feel important and necessary to the company’s success.

9. Develop People to Their Full Potential
Every company leaves a tremendous amount of human potential untapped because its people are inadequately developed. Provide informal feedback and coaching, cross training and opportunities for advancement. Train all new employees thoroughly in job requirements immediately upon hiring. Putting a new employee on the job to “sink or swim” results in frustration, sloppy work habits and omission of important details. Reinforce the attitudes and behavior patterns you want. A new employee is usually highly receptive to suggestions and eagerly assimilates and readily accepts the organizational vision, mission and goals.

10. Conduct Exit Interviews: Retention of talent often begins at the end of the process. Chances are, an employee who is walking out the door will be more honest and forthcoming than a person who still depends on your company for a paycheck. But in order to ensure truly effective exit interviews, a leader must establish a climate of trust long before he receives the letter of resignation.

Handling Attendance Problems within a Company

When it comes to the problems that are experienced by supervisors, most are related to attendance issues. It is a fact that more punishment is received for not showing up for work than all other causes put together. There have been a lot of changes in Federal employee benefits over the past couple of decades and these changes have given employees a bad attitude. The bad thing is these changes are making employees not want to go to work anymore and that is where the problem comes in.

When it comes to managing the attendance in your organization, you will need a plan. Within this plan, you must have some steps to follow and be successful at it. The first step you, as a human resource manager, should look into is to gain knowledge on the attendance issues. You can create a desktop guide to attendance and leave on your own. This desktop guide should include your company’s policies when it comes to attendance, leave and FMLA. The next step you should take is to make a clear expectation.

As a human resource manager, you should make sure every employee within the business knows when they are entitled to leave, if leave has to be asked for in advance, procedures they have to follow in order to request leave, and the responsibility for documenting and requesting leave belongs to them. You should also make sure the employees know the responsibility to grant leave requests should be with you and whatever other rules you have within the business pertaining to leave and attendance.

If you need to brief your staff individually when necessary, then be sure to do so. At least quarterly, you should take time out of your busy schedule to remind your employees of the general leave matters. These general leave matters include, peak workload, vacations, etc. While you are having the quarterly meeting, you should take time to tell them about contact information and call-in procedures, even if you have done it before. You should keep in mind that there are always rules that need to be followed.

If an individual does not call in when they are absent for work, they should be given a piece of paper. This piece of paper can be as simple as instructions on the leave request requirements or as complex as the discipline that someone receives for taking off of work when they knew they were needed. When someone puts in a leave request, you should make sure you document it in advance, never wait until the last minute.

When you are applying the leave rules to your employees, you will need to keep doing it. In the end, we would like to tell you to document any problems or issues you have and talk about them to the employee that is involved with these problems. You should never keep records secret, when you write something about an employee; it should be addressed to that employee. If you are a supervisor who is drafting these documents, then you can always get help from the human resource department.

Attendance Tracking – Don’t let it be your nightmare

Attendance Tracking

Tracking attendance can become a nightmare if an organization does not have an effective means to do so. Time management & Attendance Tracking is a huge part of the human resources problem, and can quickly become a serious issue if the process is not streamlined. Creating schedules alone can be a very time consuming task for any manager for Attendance Tracking. Throw in requests for paid time off, vacation, sick leave, and more, and the situation becomes very difficult indeed to manage. Doing so manually would be a full time job in and of itself even for a smaller company.

Why Attendance Tracking ?
Tracking hours and attendance can not only be an administrative nightmare, but a financial one as well. If hours are not managed effectively, it can quickly lead to the company losing hours due to time theft and other problems. While it is easy to underestimate this problem in a small company, it can grow uncontrollably as the organization itself increases in size. Once a company has become too large for the HR department to manage on a personal basis, trouble can quickly follow.

How can this inefficiency and administrative overhead be avoided? Many smaller organizations, as well as large companies, have turned to lightweight time management solutions. With the advent of “software as a service”, affordable web based packages have made it possible to largely automate the attendance and time issue. SmartSuite is an excellent example of attendance control software that can help organizations of all sizes streamline their administrative processes for Attendance Tracking. With a wealth of options, SmartSuite makes time management a simple and intuitive process.

Using SmartSuite, an employee can log in and request leave different leave categories. Managers can view archived attendance information and evaluate attendance trends over long periods of time. With such an abundance of information tracked in a completely paperless fashion, HR management has never been easier. Best of all, SmartSuite is a highly scalable solution as well for Attendance Tracking.

With the full Smartsuite Business package, an organization can move their attendance tracking and time management completely paperless. Smartsuite Business can also be integrated with hardware punch in/out systems, making it a highly flexible package that can work for almost any corporate environment. SmartSuite is just one tool of many that can help organizations to minimize time spent on administrative tasks.

Dealing with employee absenteeism

Business analysts often hesitate to put a concrete valuation on service firms because, as they note, “their inventory walks out the door every night,” referring, of course, to the companies’ employees.

Problems of such mobile inventory begin when employees don’t walk back in the door the next morning due to absences for any number of reasons. This hazard of operation applies as well to manufacturers and companies engaged in retail or distribution, not to mention all the government organizations that serve the public – in short, every employer.Work absences cost

U.S. employers an estimated 17 percent of payroll costs — a huge penalty that can make the difference between profit and loss for private organizations, or massive budget overruns for public employers.

The reasons people are absent from work usually have something to do with health — their own or that of someone else in their families. People tend to use their allowable sick leave because they confuse it with vacation days and take the attitude of “use it or lose it.” And who can blame the working mom for staying home with her sick child, or taking time during the day to tend to an ill parent.

Other people are absent from work under programs ranging from the Family Medical Leave Act to long-term disability under workers’ compensation rules. Some are absent due to problems of mental health or substance abuse.

A survey of U.S. insurers and employers indicated that on any given day, 25 percent to 33 percent of the typical work force is not at work for a variety of reasons, including scheduled time off for vacations or paid holidays, incidental absences and employee disabilities due to both occupational and nonoccupational injuries, or illnesses ranging from the mild to serious.

It gets worse: The U.S. General Accounting Office reports that three out of 10 people eligible to return to work on a given day do not, largely due to a lack of disability management by employers. That could mean that employers could cut disability costs by as much as 30 percent if they managed employee health and absences more aggressively.

The management problem stems from a general lack of coordination among all the functions that deal with employee absences. Often, companies and public organizations view employee health and disability as uncontrollable costs. They pay for absences in a variety of ways such as direct payments to disabled employees, workers’ compensation insurance premiums, employee assistance programs, medical insurance, short and long-term disability plans and sick leave.
Often the uncounted costs are even greater. These include loss of productivity and erosion of customer services that can lead to loss of business and revenue.

Direct costs of employee absences are typically managed by various individuals and departments, without coordination or cross currents of information. For the same people with the same disorder, the management of absence and the payment to employees may be handled by the supervisor (sick leave), various people in the human resources department (FMLA or short-term versus long-term disability), the employee health center (work injury and modified duty), the risk management group and insurance administrator (work injury and workers’ compensation).

All these functions are managed without much direct knowledge of the individuals involved. Many organizations are unable to answer questions such as: Is an absent person getting the right treatment from the right provider, in a timely manner?

Would an absent person be able to return to work if duties were modified to accommodate recuperation? Is absence part of a pattern that could indicate a shortfall of responsibility by the employee?

These and other questions can only be answered if employers begin a focused absence management effort that would knock down the walls separating management functions and, more important, penetrate the barriers to open communications between employer and employee.

According to one survey, companies that applied integrated disability management strategies averaged 19 percent in savings. More than a third of the companies surveyed saved 25 percent or more.

The most successful absence management programs were those that applied safety education programs to prevent injuries, return-to-work management, medical care management, use of independent medical examinations and other services that can facilitate employees’ early return to work.

The concept of facilitation of care has emerged as a keystone approach to absence management. When employees have an advocate for their prompt and effective care, the costs of their treatment and absence from work are considerably less.

Understanding Biometrics and its affordability

More and more companies are having that time management problem that no company wants – buddy punching. What is buddy punching? Simply put, having your buddy clock you in, even when you’re not there. This usually happens when an employee knows they’re running late, so they will give a call to their “buddy”, who then clocks them in so their pay won’t be affected. The more extreme cases would be an employee punching an employee in, and the employee NEVER shows up that day. This can cause a company to lose money EVERY MINUTE this occurs. How do you stop it? Biometrics. What are biometrics? In this article I will explain biometrics and how they can interact with your time and attendance software.

What are biometrics?

Biometrics are devices that identify people by one or more physical characteristics. This process is automatic, and could involve a fingerprint scan, eye scan, hand scan, or even voice recognition. Biometrics are important in Time and Attendance software, since it would be very difficult for one employee to clock in and out on behalf of another (except for the James Bond/Spy Movies). The most commonly used biometrics are Fingerprint Scans, which we will talk about later in this article.

Biometric Identification vs. Biometric Verification – What is that?

If you have been shopping around for a biometric system for your time and attendance software, you have probably come across these terms. If you haven’t, this should be one of the questions you asked when purchasing since it deals with how hard your database has to work. There are two different ways a record is compared to a database, by identification or by verification.

Biometric identification compares a biometric signature (in this case, a fingerprint) to all the records stored in a database, to determine if a match was found. The problem is that because the entire database has to be compared for a match, it can slow your system down if the database is large. This wouldn’t be good for real-time applications such as access control or time and attendance software. This is the type of biometrics that law enforcement applications use, for example, the comparison of a fingerprint from a crime scene to a database of prints collected from convicted criminals.

Biometric verification is what many time and attendance software applications have used. This involves comparing a newly-scanned biometric signature (fingerprint) to a measurement previously collected from the same person to verify that individual’s identity. For example, in our SmartSuite software, you can assign a badge ID to each person, which would be used to identify a fingerprint template. When an employee clocks in, their fingerprint will be compared to their fingerprint that was enrolled in the company’s system. If it is a match, then the employee’s punch will be recorded.

Because of this one-to-one comparison, this system of biometrics is much faster than biometric identification systems. If you have a real-time application, such as TimeKron, you would want this type of biometric system.

Understanding Fingerprint Biometrics

You may be familiar with Fingerprint Biometrics, but how do they work? When an employee enrolls in a Fingerprint-based biometric time and attendance system for the first time, the software records a template of the employee’s fingerprint and associates that template with the employee’s ID number. This template measures the relationship between various points in the fingerprint.

Each time the employee clocks in or out, the time and attendance software verifies that the newly scanned fingerprint matches the fingerprint on file with that employee’s ID number. If there is a match, the punch is recorded. Some employees will have concerns with privacy about their fingerprint being scanned. The biometric system that TimeKron uses never stores the fingerprint, only the location of certain data points on the fingerprint. Fingerprint biometric readers have a lower cost than other biometric readers, making them economical.Other benefits include low maintenance and no lost badges/cards, which means less hassle for your company.

If you are a company having problems with buddy punching, or you just want to increase your security, I suggest that you look into purchasing a biometric system. If you are an existing customer of Bioenable, you can purchase a biometric system directly from us. The fingerprint-based biometric system is easy to use, easy to setup, and easy on your budget. Call us at 1800-209-2131(From India Only) to find out more information on biometrics or click here.

Reasons to implement Attendance Management System

Attendance management is the act of managing attendance or presence in a work setting, which maximizes and motivates employee attendance thereby minimizing loss. If you are on loss due to employee downtime, then it is time to opt for a good time attendance managing system.

A few reasons to implement an attendance management software

1. Saves you lots of time and money

Managing attendance manually is a very tedious and time-consuming process. As the number of employees grow the task becomes quiet more exhausting. Similarly, the entire operation can also prove to be very costly in case you decide to hire a professional agency for this purpose. By using a attendance management software, all this can be automated.

2. Promotes optimal and consistent attendance at work

Once you start using time attendance management software, you have each employees work record for every minute. That is you have the exact performance record for each employee. This in turn ensures the employees maintain consistent performance i.e. attendance.

3. Ensures proper utilization of the human resource capital

Manual employee scheduling is another hassle in attendance management. Proper allocation of manpower to different departments and fields of work is really important for a good outcome. This can be made possible by using employee scheduling or work planning incorporated with a good attendance management software.

4. Ensures maximum productivity

Ensuring that every single minute of constructive work is recorded and rewarded properly will act as a motivation for the employees who will then strive to put in greater efforts and hence enhance the overall productivity of your business.

A good time attendance management software can automate the following for you:

1. Accumulate the attendance data for each employee from the time attendance device.
2. Automatically mark in time, out time, overtime, late entries, early outs, absence, leaves etc.
3. Overtime, work time and leave management.
4. Load attendance data into payroll software for payroll processing
5. Generate reports on attendance, leave, overtime, holiday and so on.
6. Efficient work planning/scheduling for employees.

An automated attendance management software will not only make the entire process simple, it will also provide a well-structured and analyzed report of the pattern of employee attendance and time management, which can further help you in allocating and using the human resources in your organization to the maximum possible benefit.

Motivating employees to stop late comings

As an HR person, you always had this difficult problem of managing latecomers. And many times you tried convincing yourself that some employees are too hard to change, no matter how you motivate them.

Here are some points to stop late comings forever, with guaranteed results :

1. Track your employees with an accuracy of minutes

The first and foremost thing to do is to record employee in/out times accurately. As a human, it’s impossible for you to track an employee every time he comes in or goes out. You can automate this by using a time attendance device. If you don’t have one, buy a new one; it doesn’t cost much.

2. Attendance tracking, with an option for manual editing

Time Attendance devices are very accurate in tracking your employees. But as a manager it should be possible for you to add, delete or edit data coming in from time attendance devices. Sometimes, one of your employees is late because he was on a client visit. Your time attendance device will indicate it as a late coming, but as a manager you want to change the data to include the fact.

3. Consolidate and analyze your findings

So you had been tracking employees for some time; now, consolidate your findings. Create employee wise monthly or weekly reports on latecomers. Also create department wise reports on latecomers. Analyze how many hours were lost because of latecomers.

4. Present your findings to your employees and management

Send monthly attendance summary reports to each employee, at the end of every month. Let the employees know that they are being traced. Send department wise attendance reports to department managers.

5. Implement new company policies

If your company doesn’t have good policies on late comings, create new policies. For eg. If an employee is late for more than three times a month, he loses salary for a day.

6. Motivate your employees. Find employee of the month.

As you have accurate attendance data, find the employee with the best attendance record for the month. Display the information in your notice board, publish it in your internal website, and motivate other employees.

Just imagine doing all these manually; it’s nearly impossible. You really need a software that can automate all these. A good HR software can do the following for you:

1. Interprets data coming in from a time attendance devices
2. Allows manual editing of interpreted time attendance data
3. Generates consolidated employee, department wise reports
4. Sends consolidated reports to employees and management each month end.
5. Processes salary considering your attendance rules and company policies.
6. Generates attendance summary to find the employee of the month.

Go to Top