Posts tagged web based time and attendance

Top 10 Tips for Hiring and Retaining Solid Employees

All of a company’s employees add value and contribute to its success – some in small way, others in large measure. Because sound recruitment and retention strategies provide a competitive edge, hiring should be done carefully, methodically and strategically. Here are ten ways to attract top prospects to your company and retain them once they’re on board.

1. Recruit Continuously
Aggressive companies are always on the prowl for talent. They have a sense of what skills they need now and in the future, and what type of person will be a good fit. They look even when there are no current openings, because one can never predict when an employee might leave.

2. Know What You Nee

Know the skills and personality traits that will make a person successful in a given job, so you can develop job descriptions when you’re hiring. This helps in framing interviews with potential applicants, who in turn learn in advance more about the skills needed for the position.
Initially, a job description facilitates the selection of the right employee. But a good job description also ensures that he or she has a clear understanding of responsibility, authority and expected results, so it also becomes a useful training outline.

3. Interview Many Candidates

Don’t hire the first person you like. Commit to meeting a number of people – even though you won’t be interested in most of them. If you don’t think a person is a good fit for your company, use the interview to dig up information on your competitors or create a business-development opportunity. (Who knows where your company’s next alliance partner will come from?)

4. Ask Probing Questions

The only way to find out if candidates will be a good fit for your company is to ask a lot of questions to discover whether:
they possess a positive attitude.

  • they have high energy.
  • they are trustworthy and possess good character.
  • they feel good about themselves and life.
  • they take responsibility without making excuses.
  • they desire to keep learning and hunger for growth.
  • they are willing to follow the leader and work with the team.
  • they have a good track record.
  • they are able to flow with the organization and accept change.

5. Check References

Today’s employment laws are extremely strict on how much information can be obtained regarding past employment; previous employers are not supposed to give out any information other than the length of employment. They cannot give out any information with regard to skills, attitude, attendance or anything else in the applicant’s job history while employed there.

6. Clarify Expectations
New employees seldom know exactly what is expected of them, how they will be measured, or with whom they will work the most. It’s important to communicate expectations and metrics clearly and succinctly from Day One.

7. Offer Attractive Compensation
Money buys the house and the bacon, but it also represents recognition and fairness. Talented people expect their contributions to be acknowledged and their compensation to reflect their impact. If necessary, do a competitive compensation survey.

8. Establish a Buddy System
Often overlooked yet consistently successful, mentoring systems give employees a sense of history and community when they enter a new company environment. By introducing recruits to the office culture immediately, mentors make them feel important and necessary to the company’s success.

9. Develop People to Their Full Potential
Every company leaves a tremendous amount of human potential untapped because its people are inadequately developed. Provide informal feedback and coaching, cross training and opportunities for advancement. Train all new employees thoroughly in job requirements immediately upon hiring. Putting a new employee on the job to “sink or swim” results in frustration, sloppy work habits and omission of important details. Reinforce the attitudes and behavior patterns you want. A new employee is usually highly receptive to suggestions and eagerly assimilates and readily accepts the organizational vision, mission and goals.

10. Conduct Exit Interviews: Retention of talent often begins at the end of the process. Chances are, an employee who is walking out the door will be more honest and forthcoming than a person who still depends on your company for a paycheck. But in order to ensure truly effective exit interviews, a leader must establish a climate of trust long before he receives the letter of resignation.

Handling Attendance Problems within a Company

When it comes to the problems that are experienced by supervisors, most are related to attendance issues. It is a fact that more punishment is received for not showing up for work than all other causes put together. There have been a lot of changes in Federal employee benefits over the past couple of decades and these changes have given employees a bad attitude. The bad thing is these changes are making employees not want to go to work anymore and that is where the problem comes in.

When it comes to managing the attendance in your organization, you will need a plan. Within this plan, you must have some steps to follow and be successful at it. The first step you, as a human resource manager, should look into is to gain knowledge on the attendance issues. You can create a desktop guide to attendance and leave on your own. This desktop guide should include your company’s policies when it comes to attendance, leave and FMLA. The next step you should take is to make a clear expectation.

As a human resource manager, you should make sure every employee within the business knows when they are entitled to leave, if leave has to be asked for in advance, procedures they have to follow in order to request leave, and the responsibility for documenting and requesting leave belongs to them. You should also make sure the employees know the responsibility to grant leave requests should be with you and whatever other rules you have within the business pertaining to leave and attendance.

If you need to brief your staff individually when necessary, then be sure to do so. At least quarterly, you should take time out of your busy schedule to remind your employees of the general leave matters. These general leave matters include, peak workload, vacations, etc. While you are having the quarterly meeting, you should take time to tell them about contact information and call-in procedures, even if you have done it before. You should keep in mind that there are always rules that need to be followed.

If an individual does not call in when they are absent for work, they should be given a piece of paper. This piece of paper can be as simple as instructions on the leave request requirements or as complex as the discipline that someone receives for taking off of work when they knew they were needed. When someone puts in a leave request, you should make sure you document it in advance, never wait until the last minute.

When you are applying the leave rules to your employees, you will need to keep doing it. In the end, we would like to tell you to document any problems or issues you have and talk about them to the employee that is involved with these problems. You should never keep records secret, when you write something about an employee; it should be addressed to that employee. If you are a supervisor who is drafting these documents, then you can always get help from the human resource department.

Understanding Biometrics and its affordability

More and more companies are having that time management problem that no company wants – buddy punching. What is buddy punching? Simply put, having your buddy clock you in, even when you’re not there. This usually happens when an employee knows they’re running late, so they will give a call to their “buddy”, who then clocks them in so their pay won’t be affected. The more extreme cases would be an employee punching an employee in, and the employee NEVER shows up that day. This can cause a company to lose money EVERY MINUTE this occurs. How do you stop it? Biometrics. What are biometrics? In this article I will explain biometrics and how they can interact with your time and attendance software.

What are biometrics?

Biometrics are devices that identify people by one or more physical characteristics. This process is automatic, and could involve a fingerprint scan, eye scan, hand scan, or even voice recognition. Biometrics are important in Time and Attendance software, since it would be very difficult for one employee to clock in and out on behalf of another (except for the James Bond/Spy Movies). The most commonly used biometrics are Fingerprint Scans, which we will talk about later in this article.

Biometric Identification vs. Biometric Verification – What is that?

If you have been shopping around for a biometric system for your time and attendance software, you have probably come across these terms. If you haven’t, this should be one of the questions you asked when purchasing since it deals with how hard your database has to work. There are two different ways a record is compared to a database, by identification or by verification.

Biometric identification compares a biometric signature (in this case, a fingerprint) to all the records stored in a database, to determine if a match was found. The problem is that because the entire database has to be compared for a match, it can slow your system down if the database is large. This wouldn’t be good for real-time applications such as access control or time and attendance software. This is the type of biometrics that law enforcement applications use, for example, the comparison of a fingerprint from a crime scene to a database of prints collected from convicted criminals.

Biometric verification is what many time and attendance software applications have used. This involves comparing a newly-scanned biometric signature (fingerprint) to a measurement previously collected from the same person to verify that individual’s identity. For example, in our SmartSuite software, you can assign a badge ID to each person, which would be used to identify a fingerprint template. When an employee clocks in, their fingerprint will be compared to their fingerprint that was enrolled in the company’s system. If it is a match, then the employee’s punch will be recorded.

Because of this one-to-one comparison, this system of biometrics is much faster than biometric identification systems. If you have a real-time application, such as TimeKron, you would want this type of biometric system.

Understanding Fingerprint Biometrics

You may be familiar with Fingerprint Biometrics, but how do they work? When an employee enrolls in a Fingerprint-based biometric time and attendance system for the first time, the software records a template of the employee’s fingerprint and associates that template with the employee’s ID number. This template measures the relationship between various points in the fingerprint.

Each time the employee clocks in or out, the time and attendance software verifies that the newly scanned fingerprint matches the fingerprint on file with that employee’s ID number. If there is a match, the punch is recorded. Some employees will have concerns with privacy about their fingerprint being scanned. The biometric system that TimeKron uses never stores the fingerprint, only the location of certain data points on the fingerprint. Fingerprint biometric readers have a lower cost than other biometric readers, making them economical.Other benefits include low maintenance and no lost badges/cards, which means less hassle for your company.

If you are a company having problems with buddy punching, or you just want to increase your security, I suggest that you look into purchasing a biometric system. If you are an existing customer of Bioenable, you can purchase a biometric system directly from us. The fingerprint-based biometric system is easy to use, easy to setup, and easy on your budget. Call us at 1800-209-2131(From India Only) to find out more information on biometrics or click here.

Motivating employees to stop late comings

As an HR person, you always had this difficult problem of managing latecomers. And many times you tried convincing yourself that some employees are too hard to change, no matter how you motivate them.

Here are some points to stop late comings forever, with guaranteed results :

1. Track your employees with an accuracy of minutes

The first and foremost thing to do is to record employee in/out times accurately. As a human, it’s impossible for you to track an employee every time he comes in or goes out. You can automate this by using a time attendance device. If you don’t have one, buy a new one; it doesn’t cost much.

2. Attendance tracking, with an option for manual editing

Time Attendance devices are very accurate in tracking your employees. But as a manager it should be possible for you to add, delete or edit data coming in from time attendance devices. Sometimes, one of your employees is late because he was on a client visit. Your time attendance device will indicate it as a late coming, but as a manager you want to change the data to include the fact.

3. Consolidate and analyze your findings

So you had been tracking employees for some time; now, consolidate your findings. Create employee wise monthly or weekly reports on latecomers. Also create department wise reports on latecomers. Analyze how many hours were lost because of latecomers.

4. Present your findings to your employees and management

Send monthly attendance summary reports to each employee, at the end of every month. Let the employees know that they are being traced. Send department wise attendance reports to department managers.

5. Implement new company policies

If your company doesn’t have good policies on late comings, create new policies. For eg. If an employee is late for more than three times a month, he loses salary for a day.

6. Motivate your employees. Find employee of the month.

As you have accurate attendance data, find the employee with the best attendance record for the month. Display the information in your notice board, publish it in your internal website, and motivate other employees.

Just imagine doing all these manually; it’s nearly impossible. You really need a software that can automate all these. A good HR software can do the following for you:

1. Interprets data coming in from a time attendance devices
2. Allows manual editing of interpreted time attendance data
3. Generates consolidated employee, department wise reports
4. Sends consolidated reports to employees and management each month end.
5. Processes salary considering your attendance rules and company policies.
6. Generates attendance summary to find the employee of the month.

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